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UPDATE: Go here to learn more about how Corona apps are no different from #1-selling iPhone apps.

First and foremost I want to thank all of our Corona developers, friends and family for their support regarding the new Apple 4.0 OS Terms of Service Agreement (TOS) on how it could affect you, our developers, and us, as a tools company.

Let me reassure all of you that we will do whatever it takes to make this work, just like we have been doing since Corona first started shipping.

I believe that Corona will be fine, and we are committed to delivering the best tool for multi-platform game and app creation for Apple and Android devices, and we will continue to add new features to Corona and to make it better every time we put a new release out.

I, along with my co-founder Walter Luh, have reached out to Apple both officially and unofficially, and we continue to do our diligence in regards to the new TOS. We have also been in touch with other companies that are in the same situation we are.

To this day, Apple has never officially or unofficially mentioned anything to us regarding non-compliance. The fact that Apple approved several Corona powered apps for the grand opening of the iPad store on April 3rd reaffirms our belief that we continue to be compliant and offer tremendous value to the iPhone/iPad ecosystem.

We will make sure to communicate with you any developments as soon as we know more.

Again, thank you for all your support and trust in Corona and in us.

If you have any questions, please feel free to e-mail me directly at cicaza@anscamobile.com

Carlos M Icaza, CEO
Ansca Mobile

http://www.anscamobile.com


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16 Responses to “Corona and iPhone OS 4.0”

  1. Mark

    There are two issues here. First, the introduction of an intermediate layer will potentially introduce unpredictable results in terms of app functionality and performance and any tweak to the intermediate layer for any reason is likely to produce unpredictable results in existing apps.

    I know that making sure current apps work with new iPhone OS releases is a very real task so in this context adding a new layer of software between the OS and app will add to the complexity.

    The second point is that the intermediate layer make the programming job seem easy and as a result programmers with very little experience will gravitate to these SDKs. In addition to these programmers not being aware of the first issue I mentioned, they will be writing substandard apps because of their lack of experience.

    I understand that there is profit to be had in creating and promoting these intermediate software layers but one should also understand that Apple would want to make sure that the risk of apps performing poorly is reduced as much as possible.

    Reply
  2. Thom Denick

    Who knows what Ansca thinks but it shows a refusal to take ownership of the poor App store product quality caused exclusively by Apple’s own poor approvals process. If the App sucks, it needs to be rejected by Apple.

    Reply
  3. Brad

    I know in your own way you are competition with Appcelerator, and Unity, and a few others… But you may want to do a brainstorming with them to figure out a way to get around this 3.3.1 that require less time money and effort. Because during development you can bouncing off one another to get around 3.3.1… Like using Ruby Cocoa

    Reply
  4. Martin

    [...] allows users to write iPhone games in Lua- again seems like it should be out of bounds- though a blog on the company’s site claims Apple has not given them the cease and desist. In fact, none of the [...]

    Reply
  5. michaelvk

    I understand that there is profit to be had in creating and promoting these intermediate software layers but one should also understand that Apple would want to make sure that the risk of apps performing poorly is reduced as much as possible.

    Reply

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