Posted on by

Late last week, we were contacted by the team at Deadmans Productions about three games that they have recently released. And when I say “recently,” I mean they completely built them within the past three months!

Not only that, but the Deadmans studio has even created their own Lua-based game engine on top of Corona to further expedite their own game-making operations.

I know you wanna know all about it, so I’ll stop typing now… ;-)


Ryan, Christian, and Zeke @ Deadmans Productions

Deadmans Productions officially began development operations three months ago, this past May. Since that time, we have released three games on both Android and iOS platforms using Corona SDK. No other development platform offers this much market reach and speed of development.

Our first game, released in June, was Undecided. Undecided is a utility app with six different games built into it. While developing Undecided, we learned the art of programming in Lua and memory management on mobile devices.

Corona proved to be especially useful to our art and design team as they were able to place their art directly into the app with very little coding knowledge. This allowed us — the engineering team — to focus on creating functionality rather than the placement of assets. Java or Objective-C is not friendly to non-programmers when it comes to buttons, images, text, and sound. Corona allowed us to create rapid working prototypes in a matter of hours or days rather than weeks it would take using competing products.

For our next two products, we decided to build a game engine on top of Corona SDK. The game engine, called Waterlua, is designed around any game that fits the following genres: missile defense, tower defense, strategy games, and – perhaps in the future – side-scrolling shooters. While most game development companies spend months or years developing an extensible game engine, we had one in three weeks. We were able to develop it so quickly due to Corona offering a clean programming language (Lua), native binary code, and high-level programming. Also, Corona allows the use of Classes, Modules, and meta-tables — and that allowed us to write code in the most readable and intuitive format possible.

Our two games that we just released, built with the Waterlua engine, are The Patriots US and The Patriots UK. In The Patriots US, the player must defend the U.S. Capitol from hundreds of invading British troops with a variety of weapons; in The Patriots UK, the player can invade the U.S. Capitol with the British Army. Both of these games are only separated by different AI controls. In the U.S. version, the AI controls the British army; in the UK version, the AI controls the guns on the Capitol. Both games use Particle Candy heavily for showing fancy explosions and burning British soldiers.

The Patriots US and UK editions are now available in the App Store, based on your location. If you want to play the UK edition in the United States, you have to enter the “secret code.” All of our apps are available for viewing here.

Thank you, Ansca, for providing a great product. And to everyone reading, happy programming! :-)


Posted by . Thanks for reading...

9 Responses to “Guest Post: 3 months, 3 games on iPhone and Android”

  1. Michael Ridley

    Thank you Corona and Carlos,
    When I started this company I weighed the pros and cons of every development kit out there. In my opinion Corona is the best platform out there to allow me to execute my vision of gaming for the mobile platform. Without Corona I would still be in development phase burning money and time. My team is amazing but combined with your development kit, well, you see the results.

    You can find the unlock code to play both US version and British version here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpTekryL-UE. My gift to you all as a Corona developers and comrades in arms. We will be updating Patriots in a week, much harder levels, war is never easy!!!!

    We have much more in store, I hope we make you proud!

    Michael Ridley, CEO
    Deadmans Productions

    Reply
  2. Neovive

    Congratulations on your new games and releasing them so fast!! I’m new to Corona, but really like what I’ve learned so far about the SDK and the Lua language. Lua reads so well it’s scary :).

    I would love to learn more about your Waterlua engine as it sounds interesting. Have you noticed any performance issues from adding another layer of abstraction to your Corona projects?

    Reply
  3. J. A. Whye

    “…email me at xxx@yyy.com. I would be happy to set up a call for you to talk Zeke (my dir of engineering) and I about any questions you may have.”

    And *THAT* ladies and gentlemen, is the mark of an awesome company.

    It’s the same reason why I’m committed to Ansca Mobile — they make an effort to be as open as they possibly can be.

    Jay

    Reply
  4. Robert Green

    Very cool! It’s awesome to see that modern libraries and engines are working so well for you guys. My group has a solution that’s like Corona but more stripped down, so you just work in C++ and if you want to use Lua and Box2D you can put in your own integration. Our new game engine sits on this and uses Lua and Bullet Physics and GLES 2.0 shader-based rendering, which is awesome and works surprisingly well on mobile. Yes, I’m biased so I’ve got to mention our product, BatteryTech – http://www.batterypoweredgames.com/batterytech

    Very awesome work. I love the simple buy-it-n-shoot game concept and it looks like Corona worked great for you! Your explosions are particularly fun :)

    Reply
  5. Levi Knepper

    Wow this is awesome.. really happy for you guys! I don’t want to pester you guys but man, I would love to learn more about your waterlua engine and exactly what you’ve done with it

    Reply
  6. Zeke Dean

    I am still very proud of this game engine! We have evolved it into a rapid prototyping engine to develop web powered mobile apps.

    -Zeke Dean

    Reply

Leave a Reply

  • (Will Not Be Published)