The Corona Labs Blog
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…And that’s not us talking, that’s the App Store talking! Corona-made games Beachball Pop and Garden of Orbs (our current App of the Week!) have both been chosen for Apple App Store’s “New & Worthy” spotlight. Congrats to both apps’ creators, and thank you for using Corona SDK to build your noteworthy creations!

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Last May, I had predicted that if they played their cards right, Palm/HP could challenge Apple at its own game. Since then I’ve been wondering if I should ever bother making more predictions, since nothing seemed to be happening from the Palm division. Then yesterday the TouchPad was announced. Sure there’s plenty of challenges ahead for WebOS, especially on the app/developer ecosystem side. But there’s still hope I can continue to moonlight as a tech pundit. After all, the same desire to deliver great experiences that runs in Apple’s blood also runs in Palm’s. You don’t need a WebOS-based device to believe me. Just look at the aesthetics of Palm’s developer portal. (Now, contrast that with Android’s…)

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Missed seeing these things, didn’t ya? Based on the incoming blog comments to our previous Corona Comics tutorials, Dwayne Ferguson of DieHard Studio will now show you how to easily yet effectively color in your comic book art as you go about making your iPad comic. In case you’ve missed any of his past pieces, Dwayne has already covered inking your art and even putting in word balloons, so you’ll be ready to go after you get coloring down pat!

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Our latest App of the Week is Garden of Orbs – a very elaborately illustrated and constructed game (with 100 levels) that probably won’t be leaving your iDevice anytime soon. Now, creators Deric Daugherty and Don Foster of Furious Apps describe how Corona SDK reinvigorated their desire to make mobile games, and how it works great even if you’re “a designer first and novice programmer second.” Garden of Orbs was originally conceived about a year ago and we (Deric Daugherty and Don Foster) dabbled on and off with the concept for a few months.  We attempted to build the game with other drag-and-drop SDK’s but were not able to get the physics quite right, nor the performance levels close to what we needed or desired.  The

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Soon after the rollout of our new audio engine, a few of our users reported some performance problems. We believe we have fixed this performance problem, but the problem itself was actually a rather bizarre bug that seems to be an Apple performance problem. So, I thought it might make for an interesting blog post.

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Remember marbles? Okay, then what about billiards? Both games are timeless and have kept scores of children and adults alike thoroughly entertained for generations. Our latest App of the Week, Garden of Orbs, just might do that too! Garden of Orbs combines the classic fun of hitting spherical objects together and the beautiful, almost Feng shui-like tranquility of exotic gardens. Seriously, even if marbles or billiards isn’t really your thing, download this game just to check out how intricately designed each of its levels are — at the very least, it could give you some landscaping ideas! But gardening aside, the gameplay and level-to-level design of Garden of Orbs deserves quite a bit of praise itself. Again, the concept is simple: use the green cue

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Our latest App of the Week was Blast Monkeys, which we loved for its goofiness as well as its well-designed gameplay. Now, Angelo Yazar of creators Yobonja! (exclamation point included) describes just how quickly they were able to make Blast Monkeys — and how they even had a little inspiration from a couple other Corona users too! Blast Monkeys began its life during a game jam experiment Tobiah and I did to as a way to check out Corona SDK. We sat down that day and both made a game. I made Test Monkeys, a game much like Blast Monkeys, except there was a limit on the number of monkeys you could blast. Tobiah made an interesting store keeper game where you buy and sell

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Carlos has been invited by the MadridTech group tonight in San Francisco to speak to a group of Madrid-based tech companies about entrepreneurship and facilitating a #1 iPhone app through his mobile company (yes, this one). The Madrid companies will be extra lucky tonight because Mike Rowehl from This is Mobility also will be on hand to provide insight on the mobile space. Mike previously was the Director of Technology over at AdMob, who were later bought out by Google. Along with currently running This is Mobility, Mike also spearheads Mobile 2.0 events around the world. They don’t call them “mobile mentors” for nothing!

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This type of question has appeared on the forums multiple times. Basically, it goes something like this: I have set up a listener callback function. But when the callback function is invoked, I would really like access to a specific variable in that callback function. The event that is passed back to me doesn’t give me access to the variable I want. How can I access my variable? There are multiple solutions to this problem, but often using a global variable is the path of least resistance. But nobody really likes being forced to use global variables when they don’t have to. Well, I’m going to introduce a much more elegant solution that leverages the true power of Lua. If you read Programming in Lua,