The Corona Labs Blog
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Our recently announced Corona roadmap features a new section named “Corona Game Edition”. I’d like to describe exactly what that is and how  it differs from Corona SDK 2.0. As Walter discussed in a previous post, Corona apps are actually built around a classic game-development structure: an Objective-C/C++ engine driven by compiled Lua. This architecture is common not only on iPhone, but on console games in general. After looking at the number of apps that our customers have written, as well as apps currently in progress, we learned that more than 50% were game apps. We therefore started to add features to Corona that are primarily of interest to game developers — the most obvious examples being a physics engine, texture-memory optimization techniques, social gaming APIs, and

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In times like these, it helps to look at the company you keep — and if you are a Corona developer, you should find comfort knowing that you’re building apps in exactly the same way as top iPhone game studios. These developers all depend on Lua to create their iPhone apps, so if Apple’s new rules were interpreted literally, it would immediately impact star players and top-selling apps. Developer Louis Gerbarg illustrates the consequences, assuming Apple would be reckless enough to apply its new rules to Lua-based games: “This affects major app store publishers, like EA, Gameloft, Tapulous, and ngmoco. Looking at the top ten lists on the app store right now I see several titles that I know have embedded Lua interpreters.” This developer’s

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UPDATE: Go here to learn more about how Corona apps are no different from #1-selling iPhone apps. First and foremost I want to thank all of our Corona developers, friends and family for their support regarding the new Apple 4.0 OS Terms of Service Agreement (TOS) on how it could affect you, our developers, and us, as a tools company. Let me reassure all of you that we will do whatever it takes to make this work, just like we have been doing since Corona first started shipping. I believe that Corona will be fine, and we are committed to delivering the best tool for multi-platform game and app creation for Apple and Android devices, and we will continue to add new features to Corona

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UPDATE: I discuss the Corona app architecture in more detail here Everyone’s up in arms today about the new iPhone SDK 4.0 rules: developers, startups, bloggers, and even our neighbors! The speculation is out of control. Seemingly innocuous phone calls we had with other developers are being tweeted about. So, in this post, I’m going to keep speculation to a minimum and talk largely about facts. Here’s the short story: The executable binaries you build using Corona are 100% Objective-C/C++. So based on our current best understanding, if you’re a Corona developer, you don’t have much to worry about! The full story: It is true that when you develop your app, you’re initially developing in Lua. But when you click “Build”, you are getting a

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KanUMaze, made with the Corona SDK from Ansca Mobile, is cheaper than a latte, give it a try today. CHALLENGE YOURSELF, CHALLENGE A FRIEND! Keep those neurons healthy. Pass the time on the bus, subway, or during a break. Millions of mazes to SOLVE that will keep you ‘mazemerized’. Twelve LEVELS from easy to mind boggling. Each level with a multitude of different mazes. Challenging mazes for all ages. Turn on the CLOCK and test yourself or compete with a friend. Guide the marble through the maze with your finger or by TILTING. Select a BACKGROUND to suit your mood. KanUMaze will even provide you with the SOLUTION.

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We’re one of the sponsors of the 360iDev conference in San Jose, CA, which runs from April 11 – 14, 2010.  360iDev is the world’s leading conference dedicated to iPhone development. We’ll be giving a few workshops where we’ll be demonstrating the latest features of Corona as well as showing off how you can simultaneously author for the iPad and Android. We’ll show the new iPad and Android Simulators and demonstrate how to port games from iPhone to Android in less than 30 seconds. Workshops: Evan Kirchhoff, Darren Osadchuck, Walter Luh and Carlos Icaza Sunday, April 11th 8am-11am, Introduction to Corona 12pm – 4pm, Advanced uses of Corona Tuesday, April 13th 3pm – 4:20pm, Scott Janousek & Evan Kirchhoff – iPhone App Development with Corona

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You’re not supposed to be seeing this. We are not having this conversation. The video below shows something that’s pre-beta, pre-alpha, not currently shipping and not ready for prime time.  In fact, it doesn’t really exist and you didn’t hear it from me. But trust me and press “play”, because you’ll be impressed at what Corona can do: Emergent behavior is cool. But that isn’t the best part! The best part isn’t in the video: you won’t believe how few lines of code it will take to build things like this. I’m really excited by our API design (that sounds odd, but I’m serious) and what it will mean for game developers. But I’ve already said too much — if this post disappears tomorrow, you’ll

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(Update: it’s now 6!) We’ve just heard from another Corona developer whose iPad app was approved by Apple, and will be included in this Saturday’s Grand Opening of the iPad App Store. This brings the total to 6 Corona-powered iPad apps in the store so far, and we know of others submitted right around Apple’s deadline that should also make it in. Again, these are native iPad apps compiled for Apple’s new “A4″ processor, not upscaled iPhone apps. We’re very excited that Corona developers have managed to hit this important milestone, even though the available development time was very short — and even though nobody had a physical iPad to test on. Well done, everybody! (The Corona SDK for iPad is currently in beta, and

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iFishies, made with the Corona SDK from Ansca Mobile, let’s you play with a school of fish! Or just relax and watch them wander about as you listen to the soothing sound of ocean bubbles. Tap once and the fish come to play. Tap twice and they run away. Trace your finger along the screen; the fish follow you unless you’re unseen. Be gentle, though, for if you shake, the fish will be scared by the ocean’s wake..