The Corona Labs Blog
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We’re one of the sponsors of the 360iDev conference in San Jose, CA, which runs from April 11 – 14, 2010.  360iDev is the world’s leading conference dedicated to iPhone development. We’ll be giving a few workshops where we’ll be demonstrating the latest features of Corona as well as showing off how you can simultaneously author for the iPad and Android. We’ll show the new iPad and Android Simulators and demonstrate how to port games from iPhone to Android in less than 30 seconds. Workshops: Evan Kirchhoff, Darren Osadchuck, Walter Luh and Carlos Icaza Sunday, April 11th 8am-11am, Introduction to Corona 12pm – 4pm, Advanced uses of Corona Tuesday, April 13th 3pm – 4:20pm, Scott Janousek & Evan Kirchhoff – iPhone App Development with Corona

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You’re not supposed to be seeing this. We are not having this conversation. The video below shows something that’s pre-beta, pre-alpha, not currently shipping and not ready for prime time.  In fact, it doesn’t really exist and you didn’t hear it from me. But trust me and press “play”, because you’ll be impressed at what Corona can do: Emergent behavior is cool. But that isn’t the best part! The best part isn’t in the video: you won’t believe how few lines of code it will take to build things like this. I’m really excited by our API design (that sounds odd, but I’m serious) and what it will mean for game developers. But I’ve already said too much — if this post disappears tomorrow, you’ll

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(Update: it’s now 6!) We’ve just heard from another Corona developer whose iPad app was approved by Apple, and will be included in this Saturday’s Grand Opening of the iPad App Store. This brings the total to 6 Corona-powered iPad apps in the store so far, and we know of others submitted right around Apple’s deadline that should also make it in. Again, these are native iPad apps compiled for Apple’s new “A4″ processor, not upscaled iPhone apps. We’re very excited that Corona developers have managed to hit this important milestone, even though the available development time was very short — and even though nobody had a physical iPad to test on. Well done, everybody! (The Corona SDK for iPad is currently in beta, and

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iFishies, made with the Corona SDK from Ansca Mobile, let’s you play with a school of fish! Or just relax and watch them wander about as you listen to the soothing sound of ocean bubbles. Tap once and the fish come to play. Tap twice and they run away. Trace your finger along the screen; the fish follow you unless you’re unseen. Be gentle, though, for if you shake, the fish will be scared by the ocean’s wake..

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CoreDamageHD, made with the Corona SDK from Ansca Mobile, has trouble in the reactor! In this addictive brick-breaking game with a tilt-controlled twist, nuclear waste is building up dangerously around the core, and only you can clear it out and prevent disaster. Battle atomic meltdown through 30 fast-paced levels of increasing difficulty Featuring “multi-ball” levels and other surprises Play “Random Level” mode for instant arcade action Optional saving of your game in progress, to automatically resume later A casual game that’s easy to pick up and play, wherever you are!

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Sudoku SuperDoK, made with the Corona SDK from Ansca Mobile, will forever change the way you experience the challenge of Sudoku. Whether you’re an expert or a beginner, there’s a puzzle for you: • Seasoned players can play the standard puzzle in easy, medium, and hard flavors. • Beginners and children can play our mini-Sudoku (2×2, 2×3 or 3×2) puzzles. For your endless amusement, Sudoku SuperDoKu generates an infinite number of puzzles. Our proprietary algorithms ensure that you’ll never run out of puzzles. If you’ve never played Sudoku before, playing Sudoku SuperDoKu is a great way to sharpen your (or your child’s) logic. We offer three mini-Sudoku variations that are a perfect way to see what the excitement is all about. Enjoy the power and intelligence

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Our Corona for Android beta isn’t the only one going out this week! Yesterday, the first beta of Corona SDK for iPad was distributed to the Corona subscribers who volunteered for the “Warp 9″ beta program. (To clarify a frequent question: Corona builds native iPad applications — these are NOT iPhone apps running in compatibility mode.) Here’s our demo video of what is, as far as I know, the only 3rd-party iPad Simulator available on planet Earth today: Since the iPad is taller than many normal monitors when shown in portrait mode, we added new controls for zooming in and out. Note that the Corona iPad Simulator has more zoom levels than Apple’s iPad Simulator. Others on the Ansca engineering team wanted to stop at

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I am unofficially changing my title from Director of Engineering to Director of non-iPhone platforms. This has got to be the worst kept secret ever. We have been getting lots of requests for Android support in Corona. One user wrote that he purchased Corona, on the expectation that we’d add cross-platform support. I guess it’s pretty obvious, right? We have a grainy home video of a prototype of Corona running on Symbian posted to youtube. We have a flexible, high performance engine written from the ground up for portability. It doesn’t take a huge stretch of the imagination to connect the dots, and you’re all very smart people. Well, it’s my distinct pleasure to confirm that, yes, indeed, actually we are actively working on an

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At this year’s Game Developer Conference, there was no official Adobe presence, but they definitely came up in conversations among iPhone tool developers: <i>”Are they REALLY going to build for the App Store in Windows?</i> As everybody presumably knows by now, one of the promised features in Flash CS5 is a “Flash packager”, which is a cross-compiler that takes Actionscript 3 code and runs it through the open-source LLVM to produce ARM machine code for the iPhone, while (presumably) doing some translation of assets and transitions. For example, a Flash sprite could be turned into bitmap texture data on the iPhone GPU, and then a position tween could be translated directly, but a shape tween probably can’t be handled in the same way, due to

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One of the easiest ways to create great looking UI’s in your apps is to use the same Photoshop and Illustrator assets that interactive design houses use to mock up an iPhone app: http://www.teehanlax.com/blog/2009/06/18/iphone-gui-psd-30/ http://www.mercuryintermedia.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/iphone-ui-vector-elements