The Corona Labs Blog
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Having a party tonight? Get the most popular Wikipedia cocktail recipes on your iPad, in a fun and easy to use application: – Use the fun Wiki Cocktail Machine, made with Corona SDK from Ansca Mobile, to pick a random drink – Browse by spirit, or the index to find a specific recipe – Find cocktails based on your taste through our mixologist selections – Learn more about drinks history, in our drink wiki cards – Choose between Imperial (oz) or Metric (cl) units

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An iPad application made with Corona, Wiki Cocktail Machine HD, has reached #8 in the Lifestyle category. Currently, it’s ahead of The Betty Crocker Cookbook for iPad in the free rankings: Congratulations to developer Oecoway, Inc.! A version of Wiki Cocktail Machine for iPhone is also available on the App Store.

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Entertain and educate your toddler with the fun spinning action of Sound Spinner! The Barnyard Edition of the Sound Spinner app, made with Corona SDK from Ansca Mobile, is a fun way for children to learn about animals with illustrations and real animal sounds. Spin the farmer and hear the sound of the animal he points to, or tap an animal directly to hear the sound it makes. Quality, varied animal sounds will delight youngsters! Need a little peace and quiet? Turn the audio off with the touch of a button. Want to quiz your young one? Turn the animal labels off. Combine these two toggles to quiz for audio, visual, and reading recognition. A great and fun way to introduce young ones to technology

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We’ve been promoting the physics engine in Corona Game Edition, but how does it actually work, in concrete terms? How do you integrate it with familiar Corona code? This two-minute video, starring the humble crate, attempts to answer these questions: Of course, a crate is about the simplest possible case for a physics engine. But one test of a development tool is that simple tasks should be simple, and we think you’ll agree that we’ve accomplished that here.

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In a recent blog entry, Dr. Brian Burton of Burtons Media Group compared a number of game engines for iPhone, iPad and Android, and concluded: “I have given this a LOT of thought. I’m regularly asked by my students and others which engine(s) I am using. For 2D development, I have decided to go with Corona. I like the platform and being able to develop for multiple systems at the same time.” Dr. Burton has also created some helpful tuturial videos for brand-new Corona developers: iPhone Game Development with Corona: Getting Started – Hello World Android Game Development with Corona: Getting Started Developing iPhone/iPad/Android Games with Corona: Working with Buttons If you’re new to Corona development, you should definitely give these a look!

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We recently spoke with Matt Pringle, designer and author of the new game Alien Horde, about his experiences developing the game. You can learn more about the game at www.alienhorde.com, and a video is on youtube. Tell us a bit about yourself, what kinds of work you have done. I’m a graphic designer by trade and have worked as one for 10 years now. I started out studying Aerospace Engineering at University but I wanted to do something a little more creative so I decided to become a designer. I’ve worked for clients such as Electronic Arts and 3DO in the game industry producing renderings, packaging and logo designs. These days I mostly design and build websites, working for a design company in Manchester, England.

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You are the last surviving member of a UNMC rescue party. Your whole squad murdered by hostile alien life forms. Surrounded, they are attacking you from all sides. The only option is to fight, take as many of them with you as you can. Turn the marine with the on screen controls, the accelerometer or the compass to get an alien in your sights. Wait for the scanner to lock on, press shoot and boom! No more alien… Your shotgun shells are your life, run out and you won’t survive the next close encounter. When an alien gets too close you use up one shell defending yourself. Every 500 points you get an extra shell, if you can survive that long… Alien Horde, made with

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We’ve just put up a new trailer for Corona Game Edition, featuring a montage of demos. The cool thing is that most of this footage is actually from sample code that ships with the current alpha version — and the rest should be turned into sample code shortly.

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Okay, I’m sitting here on a Friday night, waiting for what we think is the last build before Corona Game Edition Alpha 1 can be pushed out the door. At that time we’ll have a welcome celebration…. we’ve said we wanted to push it out every week for the last 3, and it just hasn’t quite come together. Corona 2.0 Beta 4 and 5 have taken priority, and there’s been one thing after another to keep us occupied. Meanwhile we keep adding features, which means the docs have to be updated, and Evan keeps futzing with the demos because, well, it’s just so much fun to play with. So knock on wood, we’ll have it ready in a matter of minutes. This time for sure!

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While working out last-minute issues with deploying Game Edition Alpha, we’ve used the time to produce a stack of cool sample projects. (I often find it easier to learn from code samples than from documentation, and from what we’ve heard, a lot of our users feel the same way.) So far, my favorite Game Edition sample code is “SimplePool”, which uses our new physics engine to literally implement an entire game of billiards for iPad in just 200 lines of code! Better yet, the majority of that code is used to position the objects and initialize their physical properties; the physics engine then takes over and manages most of the game automatically. This is the nice thing about physical simulations: you just need to set