The Corona Labs Blog
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Today, we’re über-stoked to announce the Corona Indie Bundle — five hall of fame Corona SDK games that are now available in one 99¢ package. Spurred by the idea of the Humble Indie Bundle for PC games, Brock Henderson of Chicago-based Crawl Space Games first brought the idea our attention. So, after some e-mails, four more top-notch Corona developers were on-board to have their games included in the bundle. The Corona Indie Bundle includes five games which have topped App Store and Android store charts worldwide and sold over 2.25 million copies individually across the iPhone, iPad,Android, and NOOK Color. The Secret of Grisly Manor: Sold over 100,000 copies on iPhone and iPad, and has been a Top 5 paid app in the Amazon Android Appstore and Top 20 in Barnes & Noble’s

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A couple times a week here at Ansca offices, we order out for lunch. While our staff likes a wide variety of dishes (Mexican, Italian, sushi, etc.), King Walter usually has the final say on the day’s food choice based on his favorite — and it’s always Thai. Now, Walter can just make his own lunch at home and bring it to the office thanks to Thai Cooks, our latest App of the Week. Thai Cooks is a non-gaming app (yes, Corona SDK users make plenty of those too!) packed with more than 100 recipes of the tastiest Thai treats. This iCookbook lists its plethora of dishes in an easy-to-navigate menu, categorized by E-san, curries, sea food, soup, and a whole lot more. Each dish has its own page

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It’s probably no surprise to you and your Corona SDK users that a lot of mobile developers are often “going it alone” — running small or even solo operations on a quest to make a name in the world of app development! Of course, the good folks over at ReadWriteMobile also have noticed this: One of the great beauties of Web technology is that the barrier for entry into innovation has been significantly lowered. In the mobile world, all you really need to know to build an application are the rudiments of coding and how to work within various native frameworks, like iOS or Android. Yet, independent developers face steep challenges in not only creating dynamic applications but trying to get anybody to use them.

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In case you missed it, as of Daily Build 619, subscribers can now place Lua scripts (with an exception of main.lua) in sub-folders within their project directory for iOS apps (doesn’t apply to Android apps just yet). There’s a few important things to note, however. When using the require() function in Lua, slashes (“/”) are not supported when accessing files in sub-directories (as with usual file operations). Instead, you use a “.” to signify a directory level. This also means you cannot have a “.” in your module name.

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Dear Universe, I remember when it all started, moving that turtle around on the screen in elementary school. I remember programming Basic on an Apple ][. I remember seeing Toy Story. I remember my Dad giving me an iPod for Christmas. I remember sitting in the audience listening to Steve give a eulogy for Mac OS Classic at WWDC. I remember seeing him so incredibly excited to give a “small token” of appreciation at the Apple all-hands by giving everyone an iPod shuffle. I remember seven years ago sitting in my office on the third floor of Apple’s main campus when (ding!) an e-mail from Steve Jobs lands in my inbox. I remember him beginning the e-mail simply with the word “Team”. I remember thinking

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Three years ago. That’s right. Three years ago, nobody knew who the heck we were. I would tell people I had started a company and it was a mobile software company, and nobody had a clue as to what I was working on, let alone understand the market the way Walter and I did. We informally started the company in mid-2008, and began the tireless hustle and sleepless nights of courting VC funding in 2009. Finally, on 09-09-09, we got funded at the tune of $1 million dollars. That was in 2009. During most of 2010, still, nobody knew who we were. We had an abysmal website with no traffic, hardly any apps made with Corona, no active developer community, and we were burning cash

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Last week, I covered Local Notifications, which is an awesome new feature that recently came through the Corona Daily Builds (available to subscribers only). Today, I’m going to show you how to handle notifications when your app is not currently in the foreground (a question that came up in the comments section of last week’s post), as well as give you a quick update on all the other things that recently got pushed in.

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When I was little, my mom used to draw up multiplication problems for me on the weekends to keep my math skills sharp. Eventually, those self-written problems on notebook paper gave way to workbooks bought from school supply stores — either way, it wasn’t much fun! Of course, that was well before the days of smartphones (or cell phones altogether). If that was now, our latest App of the Week might have made it a little more fun. Step into the math dojo with Factor Samurai! The following App Store comment sums up Factor Samurai the best: Indeed, Factor Samurai utilizes the familiar swipe-based gameplay of the popular Fruit Ninja game (thank you , sample code!) and puts an effectively educational spin on it. No longer are you mindlessly

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Not taking anything away from immaculately created non-gaming apps like Canyon Country or NapKeeper, but the decision for this month’s App of the Month was actually pretty easy. One game stood out for its excellent graphics and seamless animation combined with a simple-yet-fun (dare I say thrilling?) premise and gameplay. I’m talking about Critter Quitter! Critter Quitters’  has mass appeal across all ages, which great for any app’s longevity. It is easy to play, great to look at, and has enough little perks and nuggets (smashing bugs with a machete or mini-nuke? AWESOME!) to keep things interesting past the first few minutes of play. And, as an added bonus, since we last featured Critter Quitter on here, creators Impulsis Games have now brought the previously iPad-only game

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Imagine our surprise when we received the news. Walter and I went into automatic Google mode,  to see if anybody was pulling a prank on us. I am known to pull some elaborate pranks, so it wouldn’t surprise me if one of my friends would pull a prank of this magnitude. (yes, it’s happened before) Turns out, it was for real! I, along with Walter, would like to thank you for voting for us, and for trusting our Corona SDK as your platform of choice when it comes to mobile game development. This truly is an honor and it is an honor for us to provide you with the #1 framework for mobile development. Being named one of the most innovative startups not only reassures