The Corona Labs Blog
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Late last week, we were contacted by the team at Deadmans Productions about three games that they have recently released. And when I say “recently,” I mean they completely built them within the past three months! Not only that, but the Deadmans studio has even created their own Lua-based game engine on top of Corona to further expedite their own game-making operations. I know you wanna know all about it, so I’ll stop typing now… Deadmans Productions officially began development operations three months ago, this past May. Since that time, we have released three games on both Android and iOS platforms using Corona SDK. No other development platform offers this much market reach and speed of development. Our first game, released in June, was Undecided.

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Last month, we named the Lemmings-style Chickens Quest as our App of the Week. Since then, it’s been featured as The GameTrail’s Free Game of the Day. Now, we talk to creator Marco Bologna of GuGuGames and get his insight on how easy it was — as a first-time Corona user — to make such a fun and great-looking game. As a developer, what type of past experience do you have with other programming languages and platforms (besides Corona)? I have over 20 years of experience as a programmer, all beginning when I was 16 with C64. That was when, in order to do something nice, we needed to develop in machine code — but that’s more prehistoric than what you were probably going for! Now, I’m a

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As mobile developers, chances are that none of us are too good at sports. Sure, we might be fans, but when it comes to throwing the long ball or executing a 360º slam dunk. But what we may lack in calf muscles we make up for in brain power, and now we can put it to great use playing our latest App of the Week — the hoop-shooting puzzle game MixZle. Yes, with MixZle, you can make stadiums full of crowds roar as you dazzlingly slam a basketball through a hoop — well, not really. Actually, it’s a nifty, physics-based mosaic puzzle game that will massage your brain in order to put the ball into the net. Each of the 100+ levels presents you with a

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Functions in Lua are an integral part of any Corona script, with one of the primary benefits being the ability to run an entire block of code just by simply calling the function. This usefulness really shines when the function needs to be called several different times throughout runtime. But what happens if you need to use the same functions across multiple modules? For instance, if you have many different levels, should you really have to write (or copy/paste) the code for creating the main character, drawing the score display, pause buttons, etc. (things common to all levels) over and over again? Of course not.

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There has been a lot of material presented over the last four parts. In this final part, we will finally go into some detail about our automated testing system for Android. We will also finally get an opportunity to bring everything together by looking a little more how our shell scripts orchestrate the test run and connect components from the previous parts. Android was a lot easier to setup automated on-device tests than iOS because the entire toolchain is command line driven. But ironically, actually running the tests has been more unreliable for us, mostly due to some bug related to adb. For some reason we can’t explain, adb will hang on us and it will not allow us to communicate with our device. This has

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We allow Corona developers to also build for the Xcode iOS Simulator. Sometimes the simulator is preferable to our Mac or Windows simulator because the Xcode Simulator behaves more like a real device. Since we officially support the Xcode Simulator, we run our automated tests on the Xcode iOS Simulator to help verify our stuff actually works. While we could theoretically reuse the same process of scripting Xcode that we described in Part 2, we opted for a slightly different approach. As described in Part 2, Xcode 4 broke everything so we didn’t want to put this in the same critical path. Furthermore, Xcode 4 has some very nice speed improvements and reduces our build times to almost half. So instead, we simply use the command

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Phew! We did it. Thanks to all of you, we had a great and smooth release. The most ambitious release to date of our Corona SDK went without a hitch last week. We got the bits out the door almost perfect — yes, there were some quirks but nothing that would have caused us to recall and stop the release altogether. We are getting there slowly but surely and, with your support and feedback, we have been able to address and fix some last-minute issues that crept up. I would like to thank the team at inMobi for providing a hotline for our users and for being on top of the forums the day of release and the days after. The team showed up at