Corona SDK 2.0 Public Beta

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, iPad, iPhone, News & Announcements.

In case you missed last week’s email: Corona SDK 2.0 Beta 4 is now available as a public trial, featuring multi-platform authoring for iPhone, iPad and Android. Both subscribers and trial users can download the beta here. If your Corona trial period has already expired and you’d like it extended for another 30 days to try the new features, that’s no problem: simply email your request to beta@anscamobile.com. Until our 2.0 beta period ends later in June, you can still subscribe to Corona at the introductory rate of $99 — and, as we previously announced, you will also receive an upgrade to the full version of Corona SDK 2.0 (a $249 value) at no additional charge. What’s New in Corona? New Corona simulators for iPad and Android, including zoom


Thoughts on Apple and Adobe

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, Flash, iPhone.

Update: Fake Steve agrees with me that it was a bad romance. It dawned on me recently that the best way to understand the very public and continuing spat between Apple and Adobe is to think in terms of a marriage gone bad, one that’s been heading south for quite some time. In Good Times and in Bad During their honeymoon, Apple and Adobe did (insanely) great things together. SJ (Steve Jobs) calls this period their “golden years”, reminiscing how “the two companies worked closely together to pioneer desktop publishing and there were many good times.” But over the years, the relationship has gone through multiple ups (product launches on Apple products like Postscript, Photoshop, and Illustrator) and downs (product competition like postscript fonts vs


Introducing Corona Game Edition

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, Game Development, iPad, iPhone, Lua, News & Announcements, Tech.

Our recently announced Corona roadmap features a new section named “Corona Game Edition”. I’d like to describe exactly what that is and how  it differs from Corona SDK 2.0. As Walter discussed in a previous post, Corona apps are actually built around a classic game-development structure: an Objective-C/C++ engine driven by compiled Lua. This architecture is common not only on iPhone, but on console games in general. After looking at the number of apps that our customers have written, as well as apps currently in progress, we learned that more than 50% were game apps. We therefore started to add features to Corona that are primarily of interest to game developers — the most obvious examples being a physics engine, texture-memory optimization techniques, social gaming APIs, and


Lua: the lingua franca of iPhone games

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, iPhone, Lua.

In times like these, it helps to look at the company you keep — and if you are a Corona developer, you should find comfort knowing that you’re building apps in exactly the same way as top iPhone game studios. These developers all depend on Lua to create their iPhone apps, so if Apple’s new rules were interpreted literally, it would immediately impact star players and top-selling apps. Developer Louis Gerbarg illustrates the consequences, assuming Apple would be reckless enough to apply its new rules to Lua-based games: “This affects major app store publishers, like EA, Gameloft, Tapulous, and ngmoco. Looking at the top ten lists on the app store right now I see several titles that I know have embedded Lua interpreters.” This developer’s


Corona and iPhone OS 4.0

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, iPad, iPhone, Lua.

UPDATE: Go here to learn more about how Corona apps are no different from #1-selling iPhone apps. First and foremost I want to thank all of our Corona developers, friends and family for their support regarding the new Apple 4.0 OS Terms of Service Agreement (TOS) on how it could affect you, our developers, and us, as a tools company. Let me reassure all of you that we will do whatever it takes to make this work, just like we have been doing since Corona first started shipping. I believe that Corona will be fine, and we are committed to delivering the best tool for multi-platform game and app creation for Apple and Android devices, and we will continue to add new features to Corona


Do Apple’s new rules affect you?

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, iPad, iPhone, Lua.

UPDATE: I discuss the Corona app architecture in more detail here Everyone’s up in arms today about the new iPhone SDK 4.0 rules: developers, startups, bloggers, and even our neighbors! The speculation is out of control. Seemingly innocuous phone calls we had with other developers are being tweeted about. So, in this post, I’m going to keep speculation to a minimum and talk largely about facts. Here’s the short story: The executable binaries you build using Corona are 100% Objective-C/C++. So based on our current best understanding, if you’re a Corona developer, you don’t have much to worry about! The full story: It is true that when you develop your app, you’re initially developing in Lua. But when you click “Build”, you are getting a


Smuggled footage from Ansca Labs: Corona physics engine test

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Game Development, iPhone.

You’re not supposed to be seeing this. We are not having this conversation. The video below shows something that’s pre-beta, pre-alpha, not currently shipping and not ready for prime time.  In fact, it doesn’t really exist and you didn’t hear it from me. But trust me and press “play”, because you’ll be impressed at what Corona can do: Emergent behavior is cool. But that isn’t the best part! The best part isn’t in the video: you won’t believe how few lines of code it will take to build things like this. I’m really excited by our API design (that sounds odd, but I’m serious) and what it will mean for game developers. But I’ve already said too much — if this post disappears tomorrow, you’ll


6 Corona-powered iPad apps accepted for Grand Opening (so far!)

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, iPad, News & Announcements.

(Update: it’s now 6!) We’ve just heard from another Corona developer whose iPad app was approved by Apple, and will be included in this Saturday’s Grand Opening of the iPad App Store. This brings the total to 6 Corona-powered iPad apps in the store so far, and we know of others submitted right around Apple’s deadline that should also make it in. Again, these are native iPad apps compiled for Apple’s new “A4″ processor, not upscaled iPhone apps. We’re very excited that Corona developers have managed to hit this important milestone, even though the available development time was very short — and even though nobody had a physical iPad to test on. Well done, everybody! (The Corona SDK for iPad is currently in beta, and


Corona, now with a lot more iPad

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, iPad, News & Announcements.

Our Corona for Android beta isn’t the only one going out this week! Yesterday, the first beta of Corona SDK for iPad was distributed to the Corona subscribers who volunteered for the “Warp 9″ beta program. (To clarify a frequent question: Corona builds native iPad applications — these are NOT iPhone apps running in compatibility mode.) Here’s our demo video of what is, as far as I know, the only 3rd-party iPad Simulator available on planet Earth today: Since the iPad is taller than many normal monitors when shown in portrait mode, we added new controls for zooming in and out. Note that the Corona iPad Simulator has more zoom levels than Apple’s iPad Simulator. Others on the Ansca engineering team wanted to stop at


Corona, now with a lot more Android

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, iPhone, News & Announcements.

I am unofficially changing my title from Director of Engineering to Director of non-iPhone platforms. This has got to be the worst kept secret ever. We have been getting lots of requests for Android support in Corona. One user wrote that he purchased Corona, on the expectation that we’d add cross-platform support. I guess it’s pretty obvious, right? We have a grainy home video of a prototype of Corona running on Symbian posted to youtube. We have a flexible, high performance engine written from the ground up for portability. It doesn’t take a huge stretch of the imagination to connect the dots, and you’re all very smart people. Well, it’s my distinct pleasure to confirm that, yes, indeed, actually we are actively working on an