Why Doodle Dash! creator Jonathan Beebe still hasn't bought that book on Objective-C

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Game Development, iPhone, Lua, News & Announcements.

Jonathan Beebe recently made a splash with Doodle Dash! for iPhone, his first foray with Corona that just received the honor of being OpenFeint’s Free Game of the Day. Below,  Jon details the process of choosing an SDK, creating Doodle Dash! (twice!) and why he still hasn’t gotten around to buying a book on Objective-C. To kick things off, can you give a background of your experience in game development? What types of platforms and languages can you work with, and which one(s) are your preferred ones to work with? I’ve been “experimenting” with game development for a couple of years now. I have been a self-taught PHP web developer since 2006 (my preferred language, that is, until I discovered Lua through the Corona SDK) and I tried my hand


Why Doodle Dash! creator Jonathan Beebe still hasn’t bought that book on Objective-C

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Game Development, iPhone, Lua, News & Announcements.

Jonathan Beebe recently made a splash with Doodle Dash! for iPhone, his first foray with Corona that just received the honor of being OpenFeint’s Free Game of the Day. Below,  Jon details the process of choosing an SDK, creating Doodle Dash! (twice!) and why he still hasn’t gotten around to buying a book on Objective-C. To kick things off, can you give a background of your experience in game development? What types of platforms and languages can you work with, and which one(s) are your preferred ones to work with? I’ve been “experimenting” with game development for a couple of years now. I have been a self-taught PHP web developer since 2006 (my preferred language, that is, until I discovered Lua through the Corona SDK) and I tried my hand


Introducing Corona Game Edition

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, Game Development, iPad, iPhone, Lua, News & Announcements, Tech.

Our recently announced Corona roadmap features a new section named “Corona Game Edition”. I’d like to describe exactly what that is and how  it differs from Corona SDK 2.0. As Walter discussed in a previous post, Corona apps are actually built around a classic game-development structure: an Objective-C/C++ engine driven by compiled Lua. This architecture is common not only on iPhone, but on console games in general. After looking at the number of apps that our customers have written, as well as apps currently in progress, we learned that more than 50% were game apps. We therefore started to add features to Corona that are primarily of interest to game developers — the most obvious examples being a physics engine, texture-memory optimization techniques, social gaming APIs, and


Lua: the lingua franca of iPhone games

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, iPhone, Lua.

In times like these, it helps to look at the company you keep — and if you are a Corona developer, you should find comfort knowing that you’re building apps in exactly the same way as top iPhone game studios. These developers all depend on Lua to create their iPhone apps, so if Apple’s new rules were interpreted literally, it would immediately impact star players and top-selling apps. Developer Louis Gerbarg illustrates the consequences, assuming Apple would be reckless enough to apply its new rules to Lua-based games: “This affects major app store publishers, like EA, Gameloft, Tapulous, and ngmoco. Looking at the top ten lists on the app store right now I see several titles that I know have embedded Lua interpreters.” This developer’s


Corona and iPhone OS 4.0

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, iPad, iPhone, Lua.

UPDATE: Go here to learn more about how Corona apps are no different from #1-selling iPhone apps. First and foremost I want to thank all of our Corona developers, friends and family for their support regarding the new Apple 4.0 OS Terms of Service Agreement (TOS) on how it could affect you, our developers, and us, as a tools company. Let me reassure all of you that we will do whatever it takes to make this work, just like we have been doing since Corona first started shipping. I believe that Corona will be fine, and we are committed to delivering the best tool for multi-platform game and app creation for Apple and Android devices, and we will continue to add new features to Corona


Do Apple’s new rules affect you?

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, iPad, iPhone, Lua.

UPDATE: I discuss the Corona app architecture in more detail here Everyone’s up in arms today about the new iPhone SDK 4.0 rules: developers, startups, bloggers, and even our neighbors! The speculation is out of control. Seemingly innocuous phone calls we had with other developers are being tweeted about. So, in this post, I’m going to keep speculation to a minimum and talk largely about facts. Here’s the short story: The executable binaries you build using Corona are 100% Objective-C/C++. So based on our current best understanding, if you’re a Corona developer, you don’t have much to worry about! The full story: It is true that when you develop your app, you’re initially developing in Lua. But when you click “Build”, you are getting a