Corona SDK bundle for TextMate

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Lua, Tech, Videos.

Darren from Ludicrous Software just sent over this video of a new Corona bundle that he created for the TextMate code editor. On his blog, he explains how the bundle includes functions like autocomplete, one-key simulator running, and built-in snippets for many common Corona codelines.  All of this lets users to code in Corona even faster than it already allows. Take a look for yourself: You can pick up Darren’s new Corona bundle for free over at GitHub, and be sure to keep tabs on him via Twitter for whenever he rolls out new bundle features. (Game Edition support, more snippets, etc.) And if you’ve made anything cool with Corona, be sure to send it over to us!


Create scrolling list views with text and graphics in Corona

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Tech, Training/Support, Tutorials, Tips and Demos.

We’ve created a set of mobile user interface frameworks that will give you a jumpstart on creating professional, touch screen apps in Corona. In this article, I’ll show you how to add text, graphics, and custom behaviors to the List View. The List View accepts a variety of parameters. The following are the basic parameters you’ll need for this tutorial: data. A table containing elements that the list can iterate through to display in each row. default. An image for the row background. Defines the hit area for the touch. backgroundColor. Specify a table that contains R, G, B values. Example: {255, 255, 255}. callback. A function that defines how to display the data in each row. Each element in the data table will be


Combine HTML and OpenGL content seamlessly in a single app

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Lua, Tech, Tutorials, Tips and Demos.

One of the big debates going around is whether a mobile developer should use HTML5 or go native.  Well, what if you didn’t have to make a choice? Even better, what if you could combine HTML inside a native app and still leverage the full power of OpenGL? Now you can! Just check out Corona’s web popup API which lets you embed a web view right inside your app. What this means is that you can create fluid OpenGL-based animations and combine them with HTML content, all in literally a couple of lines.  For example, here’s how you would animate an image moving diagonally across the screen, and make the bottom third of the screen open up a web page: [cc lang="lua"] local image = display.newImage(


Multi-touch and Physics in Corona Game Edition (with Video!)

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Game Development, iPad, News & Announcements, Tech, Videos.

In this short video (shot and edited on an iPhone 4) we show multitouch support and physics in the form of collisions. All of this was written in Corona Game Edition by one of our developers in less than half an hour, using an upcoming library that makes any physics object draggable in one line via “touch joints”. We actually think this might be the only multitouch implementation of Box2D 2.1 — at the very least, it’s the easiest one to use! On a techie geeky note, this video was shot and edited entirely on an iPhone 4, Christopher Peri has a short write up on his blog. Download your own 30 day trial of Game Edition, and feel free to use any of our sample


Corona and the new Apple TOS Agreement Changes

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, Game Development, Lua, News & Announcements, Tech.

Here at Ansca, we happily welcome the new Apple TOS relaxing the stance on third party developer tools for iOS. What does it mean to you, our current users, and for future users of the Corona SDK? It means that you can now use Corona as the development tool of choice for your cross-platform app development, for both games and non-game apps, on both iOS and Android devices. It also means that you no longer have to worry about our technology not being compliant with Apple, today or in the future. As we have done, we will continue to deliver the best development tool for app creation on iOS and Android devices. We truly believe we are delivering the fastest, easiest way to develop apps


DIY Buddy app: 6 Hours, 2 Devices, 1 Developer

Posted by & filed under News & Announcements, Tech.

Team Ansca (Gilbert Guerrero and Chia Hwu) made an app with the Corona SDK in 6 hours of actual development time at iOSDevCamp 2010.  The idea for DIY Buddy came about because Gilbert has been working on DIY projects at home and wanted a way to easily annotate photos of his projects. The app allows you to take a photo with your iPhone, add lines for measurements and text. You can also save the annotated image to the iPhone Camera Roll and email from your phone.  On the iPad, you can annotate photos in your Photo Library, save the image and email from an email program.  We think this is a useful tool for anyone doing construction projects, home decorating, and Burning Man art collaborations. The


New Video: “Physics in Five Lines”

Posted by & filed under Game Development, Tech, Training/Support, Videos.

We’ve been promoting the physics engine in Corona Game Edition, but how does it actually work, in concrete terms? How do you integrate it with familiar Corona code? This two-minute video, starring the humble crate, attempts to answer these questions: Of course, a crate is about the simplest possible case for a physics engine. But one test of a development tool is that simple tasks should be simple, and we think you’ll agree that we’ve accomplished that here.


Introductory Corona Tutorials from Burtons Media Group

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Tech, Training/Support, Videos.

In a recent blog entry, Dr. Brian Burton of Burtons Media Group compared a number of game engines for iPhone, iPad and Android, and concluded: “I have given this a LOT of thought. I’m regularly asked by my students and others which engine(s) I am using. For 2D development, I have decided to go with Corona. I like the platform and being able to develop for multiple systems at the same time.” Dr. Burton has also created some helpful tuturial videos for brand-new Corona developers: iPhone Game Development with Corona: Getting Started – Hello World Android Game Development with Corona: Getting Started Developing iPhone/iPad/Android Games with Corona: Working with Buttons If you’re new to Corona development, you should definitely give these a look!


Improved movieclip library

Posted by & filed under Corona SDK, Game Development, News & Announcements, Tech.

The external movieclip.lua library allows you to create animated sprites (sometimes called “movieclips”) from sequences of images, which can then be moved around the screen using the same techniques as any other Corona display object. Functions are available to play these animation frames, or partial sequences of these frames, in either the forward or reverse direction; to jump to specified frames; to skip to the next or previous frame; to automatically delete the animation on completion of a sequence; and to make the animation draggable, complete with press, drag, and release events. Drag boundaries have also been added in this revision. For further documentation, see the latest version of the 2.0 Beta Guide, although this library should be compatible with any version of Corona since


Introducing Corona Game Edition

Posted by & filed under Android, Corona SDK, Game Development, iPad, iPhone, Lua, News & Announcements, Tech.

Our recently announced Corona roadmap features a new section named “Corona Game Edition”. I’d like to describe exactly what that is and how  it differs from Corona SDK 2.0. As Walter discussed in a previous post, Corona apps are actually built around a classic game-development structure: an Objective-C/C++ engine driven by compiled Lua. This architecture is common not only on iPhone, but on console games in general. After looking at the number of apps that our customers have written, as well as apps currently in progress, we learned that more than 50% were game apps. We therefore started to add features to Corona that are primarily of interest to game developers — the most obvious examples being a physics engine, texture-memory optimization techniques, social gaming APIs, and