Category: Tutorials, Tips and Demos

Tutorial: the Ultimate “config.lua” File

A common question people ask when developing mobile apps is, “How do I support all of these different devices?” For iOS alone, we now have three basic screen “shapes” to contend with, in addition to multiple resolutions. Android phones/tablets, Kindle, and Nook add even more. Corona veteran and team member Rob Miracle shows you how to overcome this obstacle using a comprehensive, logical configuration file.


Tutorial: New Widgets, Part 1

The Widgets 2.0 library is now available to users with access to Daily Builds. All new widgets share a common trait: each has been written atop a new foundation that is more flexible and stable. Today’s tutorial discusses two of these: “switch” and “segmented control”. Please read further to learn how these new widgets can enhance the user interface of your app.


Tutorial: Animated Sprites and Methods

Tuesday Tutorials are back! Today’s tutorial is from Brent Sorrentino, a Corona Ambassador based in northern Colorado. Brent has been an active part of the Corona community for almost two years. He is a freelance travel photographer, Corona developer, and graphic designer. In addition to using Corona to develop his own apps, he regularly lends a hand in the forums, helping other developers solve coding issues.


Corona Guidelines: iPhone 5 and iOS6 (Preliminary)

The iPhone 5 is looking like it will be the fastest-selling gadget of all time. So let’s talk about what you need to do to prepare your Corona apps for the iPhone 5 and iOS6.

One of the biggies we’ll cover is what you’ll need to do to make your Corona app handle the new 16:9 aspect ratio, or what we’re calling “tall apps” (as opposed to the shorter “traditional apps” designed for the iPhone 3 and iPhone 4).


Tutorial: External Modules in Corona

There’s often confusion as to what exactly happens when external modules are “required” into your code, which leads to further confusion and unexpected behavior when it comes to things such as Storyboard Scenes or even custom modules of your own.

Today I’m going to guide you through a series of exercises (with explanations) that should illustrate exactly how modules work in Lua, so you get a full understanding of when the code in your modules is executed, including what code is not run when you call the built-in require() function.


Reacting to Low Memory Warnings

Whenever your app is taking too much memory, the OS will first issue what’s called a “low memory warning” to give you a chance to do something—such as free up memory—before your app is forced to quit. If your app is forced to quit, from your user’s perspective, your app will have crashed and quit (possibly causing a great deal of frustration).

In today’s tutorial, I’ll show you how to respond to these low memory warnings, and recommend things you might do to prevent crashes from occurring (and possibly even preventing low memory warnings altogether).

NOTE: Low memory warnings are currently unreliable on the Android platform, so this tutorial will focus mostly on iOS, though the preventative measures will apply to all platforms.