The Corona Labs Blog
Posted by .

As you already know, Corona includes the powerful Box2D physics engine to give your games the ultimate sense of depth by providing a high-quality, realistic physics simulation — all without you having to know much more than just the “common sense” aspects of physics. Generally, if you know that gravity makes things fall, and understand that heavier objects travel slower than lighter objects when an equal amount of force is applied, then your knowledge of physics is sufficient enough to make a great physics-based game using Corona. Piece of cake right? However, because there are several properties that affect how things behave—things we never really have to think about in the real world—sometimes your in-game physics don’t always behave exactly how you expect them to,

Posted by .

Last week, I said I was on a retro binge with games like Bloo Kid and ChocoRun. This week, I think the word games have pulled me back! I know, I know… We’ve already had a word game featured here as our App of the Month, but that shouldn’t automatically disqualify all future word games from being in the running. Especially if one of those games is Dabble! Like its rhyming counterpart, Dabble is a word game that has now gone from the game board to the mobile platform. And much like our previous word game winner Word Ball, it has its own unique spin that gives it the potential to become another staple for game players anywhere, whether on a smartphone or a coffee table.

Posted by .

To kick off the weekend, Corona enthusiasts (SDK and/or beer) packed Ansca HQ in Silicon Valley for another mighty fun meetup! Much of the night could not have been made possible without PapayaMobile, who graciously provided pizza and assorted libations for our beloved meetup brethren. Thanks guys! The meetup itself was relatively unscripted in comparison to the previous one we had with scheduled demos and presentations. Of course, that didn’t mean that there weren’t plenty of Corona pet projects being shown off by some of our guests!   And, of course, our very own Walter and Carlos stepped onto literal soapboxes to run the gauntlet of questions posed to them by attendees. I might have had a little too much Corona SDK that night to recall

Posted by .

Besides new Corona SDK updates, we know the thing you guys like most from us are meetups! So, we’re having one again at our humble abode in Palo Alto tonight. There’s no set program, but I bet we’ll be talking lots about the new Corona LaunchPad and recent (and future?) feature updates, in general. Also, this is your chance to finally corner Carlos in a dark room and make him to spill the beans on all those hints he’s still dropping! See ya tonight at 6:00!

Posted by .

This week, I’m going to cover a web technology that has been dubbed “the fat-free alternative to XML” — JSON. While XML is great, there are a few problems with it… Because XML tags on the same level can have the same name, accessing XML data from Corona can get to be really confusing if you don’t pre-localize all the children in each level of the node hierarchy with your own naming convention (very confusing). It’s really only useful if you need to read-in data from an XML file. If you need to package up data into an XML file from your Corona app, you’re in for a rough ride. Thankfully, using JSON in a Corona app is a lot more practical and the functions are integrated

Posted by .

Corona SDK developers seem to be on a retro binge lately. And hey, if the games of yesteryear have lasted this long in your collective conscience, they must have done something right! Plus, as an 80′s baby myself, I don’t mind retro games one bit. This week’s App of the Week is no different — behold Bloo Kid, in all his 8-bit glory! Bloo Kid is a perfectly built game for the mobile platform — it looks great and it’s easy to pick up and play. Upon immediately seeing it, you think Mega Man (which was an awesome game); upon maneuvering its “run + jump” controls, you think Mario Bros. (also an awesome game!)  Usually, on-screen controls can be hard to integrate seamlessly into the relatively

Posted by .

It feels like I say this every month, but this month’s App of the Week winners were nearly impossible to pick a favorite from. Of course, this isn’t much of a surprise anymore. We’ve all seen how heavily Corona developers are stirring up these days with their increasingly more popular apps. Ultimately, in a field of great-looking arcade games, we ended up up going with the one that has the most scalability — and that’s Shovel Heroes. On top of its great graphics and easily addictive gameplay, Shovel Heroes has the most capability to expand. Its “freemium” model is an ingenious way for creators Progrestar to immediately open the it up to mobile gamers via free download, and then potentially monetize with in-game currency (and

Posted by .

In anticipation of our heavily hinted launch this coming Tuesday, we wanna gauge where you (our users) currently stand in your app-making endeavors. Generally speaking, we’ve noticed three trends: Some of you are still fine-tuning your coding skills. Others are looking for ways to market your apps and boost your download numbers. (“app discovery” is the word for that) Still, some of you are looking for that one magic feature to make your dream app a reality. So, tell us — what are you looking for?

Posted by .

There are countless reasons why you might want to use XML files in your project, including (but not limited to): Storing level data (to be handled by other functions in your project). Saved user information (or game state) for later loading. Storing app settings for later loading. Using XML files as a simple information database for your app. Pulling RSS feeds (XML files) from the web to display in your app. Storing eBook page data so pages don’t have to be hard-coded. If you’ve never used or worked with XML, then this article may open your eyes to how you might take advantage of the technology. Or, you may already know and use XML regularly and are looking for a good way to extract the